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Radio in Cajamarca, Peru

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The following item is taken from Relampago DX #131 (July 2001) by Takayuki Inoue Nozaki. It is placed here with permission.

Por las Rutas del Perú (40) ...

Cajamarca, capital of the Department of Cajamarca, is a traditional and tranquil colonial city with a growing population of 124,378 according to the 1995 population census. It is located at 07-09-27 L.S. and 78-31-24 L.W. in the northern highlands at an elevation of 2,750 meters above sea level. The town name was formerly written as "Cassamalca". It is derived from the Quechua words "Cassa" and "marca", which together mean "cold plain" or "freeze land". Cajamarca and its surroundings are steeped in history and pre-history. It was one of the biggest cities in the Inca Empire and played a crucial role in the Spanish conquest of the Incas.

Various pre-Inca archeological sites have been discovered in the Cajamarca area, however, little is known about them. They are generally believed to be sites of the Chavín-influenced Cajamarca culture. The most visited site are the water channels of Cumbe Mayo and Ventanillas de Otusco. Around 1460, the Inca Empire conquered the Cajamarca people and Cajamarca became a major Inca city on the highway linking Cusco and Quito.

After the death of the Inca Huayna Capac in 1525, the Inca Empire, by then stretching from southern Colombia to Central Chile, was divided between the half-brothers Atahualpa and Huáscar. Atahualpa ruled the north and Huáscar ruled the south. Civil war soon developed and Atahualpa, who had the support of the army, gained the upper hand. It was in 1532 that Atahualpa and his victorious troops marched southward towards Cusco to take complete control of the Inca Empire. During this southbound march, Atahualpa and his army stopped at Cajamarca for a few days rest. The Inca Emperor was camped at the natural thermal springs, nowadays known as Los Baños del Inca, when he heard the news that the Spanish were nearby.

By 1532 Atahualpa was certainly aware of the existence of the strange bearded white men. In 1528, during his second voyage, Francisco Pizarro had invited an Inca noble from Tumbes to dine abroad his ship and word of this would undoubtedly have been passed on to Atahualpa. The Inca Emperor, supported by his army and flushed with victory in his civil war, would not have considered the small ragged force of Spaniards as a threat, let alone a fully-fledged invasion.

Pizarro and his force of about 160 Spaniards arrived in Cajamarca on November 15, 1532. They found a temple of the Sun, the Inca fortress, some well-made buildings housing the Inca's chosen women and a central square surrounded by assembly halls called Kallankas. The approximately 2,000 inhabitants were with Atahualpa at his encampment by the thermal springs, about six kilometers away. Francisco Pizarro sent a force of about 35 horsemen and a native interpreter to Atahualpa's camp with the purpose of asking the Inca Emperor where the Spaniards were to stay. They were told to lodge in the Kallankas surrounding the plaza and that the Inca would join them the next day.

The small force of Spaniards spent an anxious night fully aware that they were severely outnumbered by the Inca troops, which were estimated as being between 40,000 and 80,000 strong. The Spaniards plotted throughout the night and decided to try and entice Atahualpa into the plaza and, at a pre-arranged signal, capture the Inca Emperor should the opportunity present itself. If this did not occur, they were to maintain a friendly relationship and hope for another chance to capture Atahualpa in the future. The next morning Pizarro stationed his troops in the Kallankas and surrounded three sides of the plaza. Each had about 20 doorways so that a large number of the Spaniards could emerge and attack at the same time.

Atahualpa kept the Spaniards waiting all day, much to their consternation. He did not break camp until the afternoon and did not reach Cajamarca until early evening. His vast army came with him. Upon arriving at the outskirts of the city, the Inca Emperor ordered the majority of his troops to stay outside while he entered the plaza with a retinue of nobles and about 6,000 men armed with slings and hand axes. The Spanish friar, Vicente de Valverde, met him. The friar, Bible in hand, attempted to explain his position as a man of God to Atahualpa and presented the Inca with the Bible. Atahualpa angrily threw the book to the ground and Valverde took this as an insult to Christianity and provided the excuse he needed to absolve the Spaniards in advance for an attack upon the Inca. He rushed back to the Kallankas and prevailed upon Pizarro to order the firing of his cannons in to the midst of the Indians. This was the pre-arranged signal for attack.

The cannons were fired and the Spanish horsemen attacked amidst much trumpeting and yelling. The Indians, who had never seen cannons or horses before, were both terrified and completely bewildered by the fearsome onslaught. Their small hand axes and slings were no match for the well-armored Spaniards swinging razor-sharp swords from the advantageous height of horseback. The Indians tried to flee but the entrance to the plaza was too narrow to allow escape. By sheer weight of numbers, they knocked down a section of wall two meters thick and swarmed out of the plaza in total disarray. Pizarro's horsemen charged after them, chopping and hacking down as many Indians as they could. Meanwhile, Pizarro himself led a small contingent of men and succeeded in capturing Atahualpa. As the sun set over Cajamarca on the evening of November 16, the course of Latin American history was changed forever. With an estimated 7,000 Indians dead and Atahualpa captured, the small band of Spaniards had succeeded beyond their wildest hopes. Now they literally were conquistadors.

Almost immediately after he was captured, Atahualpa became aware of one of the weaknesses of the Spaniard - namely, a lust for gold. Accordingly, he offered to fill a large room once with gold and twice with silver in return for his freedom. The conquistadors were astounded by their good fortune and quickly agreed to Atahualpa's offer. They led Atahualpa to believe that they would not only release him after the ransom was paid, but also would return him to his northern lands around Quito.

This was a wily move on the part of Pizarro. By promising Atahualpa's return to Quito, he effectively controlled the northern part of the Inca Empire. And by holding Atahualpa captive, Pizarro also maintained control of the southern half of the empire because the inhabitants of this region, having just been beaten by Atahualpa in a civil war, considered him an enemy and looked upon Pizarro as a liberator rather than an invader. This playing off of one Inca faction against the other was Pizarro's strongest weapon. If the Inca Empire had been united when the Spaniards arrived, the story of the conquest would have been an entirely different one.

The gold and silver slowly began to arrive at Cajamarca. Pizarro sent some of his men to Cusco to ensure the collection of the ransom. Meanwhile, Atahualpa was held as a royal prisoner, with the servants and comfort he was accustomed to. They were also waiting for reinforcements. On April 14, 1533, Diego de Almagro arrived from the coast with 150 soldiers, thus almost doubling the Spanish force at Cajamarca. Atahualpa began to suspect that the Spaniards were lying to him and that he would not be released and returned to Quito when the ransom was paid. Finally, in the middle of June 1533, the ransom was complete and Pizarro ordered the melting down and distribution of the treasure. Careful records were kept of these procedures and it is known that about 6,000 kilograms of gold and 12,000 kilograms of silver were melted down into gold and silver bullion.

Atahualpa was still a prisoner and now he knew that he was not going to be released. He sent desperate messages to his followers in Quito to come to Cajamarca and rescue him. The Spaniards heard of this rescue attempt and became panic-stricken. Although Pizarro was not anxious to kill the Inca Emperor, thinking to further his own aims by continuing to hold Atahualpa hostage and using him as a puppet ruler, the other leading Spaniards insisted on the Inca's death. Despite the lack of a formal trial, Atahualpa was sentenced to death for attempting to have himself rescued. On July 26, 1533, Atahualpa was led out to be burnt at the stake. At the last hour, Atahualpa accepted baptism and his sentence was changed to a more humane death by strangulation.

Immediately after Atahualpa's death, the Spaniards crowned Tupac Huallpa, a younger brother of Huascar, as the new Inca Emperor. With this new puppet ruler, the Spaniards were free to march into Cusco as liberators. During the march, the new Inca Emperor died of an unknown illness and the Spanish arrived in Cusco on November 15, 1533 without an Inca ruler. Today, little remains of Inca Cajamarca. Most of the great stone buildings were torn down to be used in the construction of Spanish homes and churches. The great plaza where Atahualpa was captured and later killed was roughly in the same location as today's Plaza de Armas, although in Atahualpa's time it was a much larger plaza. The plaza where Inca Atahualpa was ambushed and the stone altar are set high on Santa Apollonia Hill, where he is said to have reviewed his subjects. There is a road to the top, or the physically fit can walk up from Calle Dos de Mayo using the steep stairway. The view from the top, over red-tiled roofs and green fields, is worth the exertion, especially very early in the morning during the beautiful sunrise. The Plaza de Armas where Atahualpa was executed, has a 350-year-old fountain, topiary and gardens. There is a fine central fountain, which dates to 1692 and thus commemorates the 200th anniversary of Columbus's landing in the Americas. The town's inhabitants congregate in the plaza every evening. Strolling and discussing the day's events are traditionally popular activities. Two churches that face onto the Plaza de Armas are the Cathedral and San Francisco. Both are often illuminated in the evening, especially at weekends. The Cathedral is a squat building, which was begun in the late 1660's and only recently finished. In common with most of Cajamarca's churches, the Cathedral has no belfry. This is because the Spanish crown levied a tax on finished churches and so the belfries were not built, leaving the church unfinished and thereby avoiding taxes. One exception to this rule is the Church of San Francisco, whose belfries were finished this century, too late for the Spanish crown to collect its tax. The Cuarto de Rescate is not the actual ransom chamber but in fact the room where Atahualpa was held prisoner. A red line on the wall is said to indicate where Atahualpa reached up and drew a mark, agreeing to have his subjects fill the room to the line with gold treasures and twice with silver treasures. The room was closed to the public for centuries and used by the nuns of Belén hospital.

On February 21, 1821, the Province of Cajamarca was created as a result of a new political division of the Department of La Libertad. Subsequently, on February 11, 1858, the Department of Cajamarca was created by Gran Mariscal Ramón Castillo. Bordering upon Ecuador to the north, it is surrounded by the Department of Amazonas to the east, the Department of La Libertad to the south, the Department of Lambayeque to the west and the Department of Piura to the northwest. The department is politically divided into thirteen provinces; Cajamarca, Cajabamba, Celendín, Chota, Contumazá, Cutervo, Hualgayoc, Jaén, San Ignacio, San Marcos, San Miguel, San Pablo and Santa Cruz. The Province of Cajamarca, which encompasses 2,979.78 square kilometers, is divided into twelve districts: Cajamarca, Asunción, Los Baños del Inca, Cospán, Chetilla, La Encañada, Jesús, Llacanora, Magdalena, Matara, Namora and San Juan. The population of the whole province is 251,061 according to the 1995 population census.

Cajamarca is located 865 kilometers north of Lima, the capital of Peru. Nowadays, it is easily accessible from Lima. Most major bus companies operate up and down the coast along the Pan-American Highway. It costs US$15 for the 15-hour ride the bus. Aero Continente operates daily flights between Cajamarca and Lima. There are also daily flights to Trujillo. The airplane trip costs US$57 between Cajamarca and Lima and takes only one hour.

Cajamarca has been known among Latin American DX enthusiasts as one of the famous epicenters of shortwave broadcasters in northern Peru as well as for other provincial towns in the Department of Cajamarca. It was in the 1950's that the broadcasting activity in Cajamarca was started by Radio Cajamarca on two frequencies: OAX2D 1370 kHz medium wave and OAX2G 4770 kHz in the 60-meter band shortwave. The first commercial station in the department was established by José Eduardo Cavero Andrade, being one of the stations belonging to the Cadena Nacional Sociedad Anónima. The shortwave outlet was occasionally reported in DX bulletins between 1958 and 1970. However, it has been listed until the 27th edition of the World Radio TV Handbook in 1974.

On June 8, 1967, OAX2W Radio Atahualpa, the second commercial station in Cajamarca, was founded by Roberto Cruzado Ossio, as one of the stations belonging to the ORC Network (Organización Roberto Cruzado). The station initially transmitted on 850 kHz medium wave. Afterward, its frequency was changed to 1380 kHz. On December 2, 1981, OAX2V Radio Los Andes started its official transmissions on 1190 kHz under the direction of Miguel Chumbe Ortiz. Later, its frequency was changed to 1130 kHz. On November 2, 1982, OBX2F Radio Moderna commenced broadcasting on 1280 kHz. The station was inaugurated by five enterprisers: Hugo Briones Soto, Víctor Lozano Fernández, Segundo Lozano Fernández, Luciano Pérez Sangay and Alejandro Díaz Chávez. The station was also authorized to transmit on 4945 kHz in the 60-meter band with the callsign of OAZ2C. In fact, Radio Moderna has never realized its shortwave broadcasts from Cajamarca, but it established two filial stations: Radio Moderna in Celendín on 4300 kHz and Radio Moderna in San Marcos on 5275 kHz.

Until the shortwave broadcasts were booming throughout Peru in the 1980's, no stations in Cajamarca had made their debut on shortwave except for Radio Cajamarca. Since Radio Nuevo Continente made its first appearance on an out-of-band frequency of 5191.1 kHz in August of 1983, Cajamarca has been an attractive DX target.

Radio San José, one of the stations transmitting without a license, was intermittently heard in the drifting frequency range between 5736.6 kHz and 5742.7 kHz from December of 1983 through November of 1984. The station also came into existence on 1350 kHz. Identifying itself with the slogan "La Voz del Candorsito", the station was operated by the Catholic Parish Church of San José in Cajamarca.

Radio San Pedro appeared in the slightly drifting frequency range between 7433.4 kHz and 7434.2 kHz in April of 1984. The station claimed to be transmitting on a nominal frequency of 7431 kHz with 0.5 kW. Radio San Pedro was established by the Catholic Parish Church in order to broadcast the parish's evangelical programs. It was on the air experimentally with a transmitter borrowed from a church member. Afterward, the station had to go off the air when the church member asked for his transmitter back. Not long after Radio San Pedro came on the air, Radio Inca del Perú began its experimental transmissions on 4493.5 kHz from Los Baños del Inca, a small town located six kilometers from Cajamarca. The station announced that it nominally transmitted on 4495 kHz shortwave and 1592 kHz medium wave. Subsequently, the shortwave outlet moved to a measured frequency of 4237.6 kHz in August of 1987. Radio Inca remained in the frequency range between 4236.0 kHz and 4238.2 kHz until the middle of June 1992. The shortwave transmitter was later sold to Radio Cajamarca. After the medium wave outlet was authorized to conduct experimental transmissions on 1510 kHz with the callsign OCX2Q on February 3, 1988, the station changed its medium wave frequency from 1592 kHz to the assigned frequency of 1510 kHz. However, it was actually measured on 1517.0 kHz.

On October 11, 1985, Radio Omega del Perú commenced its transmissions on a measured frequency of 7434.2 kHz. The station was owned and operated by José Máximo Leiva Vásquez. The frequency was announced as 7431 kHz. This is the frequency range that was established with the transmitter which had been formerly used by Radio San Pedro in 1984.

In April of 1988, Radio Atahualpa started its shortwave operations with the callsign OAZ2F around 4820 kHz, being the third licensed shortwave station in Cajamarca. The shortwave outlet of Radio Atahualpa has not been active since July of 1993, when the shortwave transmitter was switched to be utilized for the transmissions on medium wave after the medium wave transmitter failed.

While shortwave broadcasts were booming, Cajamarca was also producing numerous pirate stations on medium wave since the middle of the 1980's. The following stations operating without licenses emerged on medium wave from the middle of 1986 through 1993: Radio Colonial on 1150 kHz, Radio Libertad on 1320 kHz, Radio Universal on 1330 kHz, Radio San José on 1350 kHz, Ondas del Perú on 1460 kHz, Radio Frecuencia Superior on 1470 kHz and La Luz de la Vida on 1598V kHz. In the middle of 1993, the Ministry of Transports and Communications raided and closed down these stations owing to having broadcast illegally without licenses. Subsequently, these pirate stations vanished from the local broadcasting scene.

In early March of 1989, Radio La Luz de la Vida made its appearance on 3194.6 kHz. The station remained in the slightly drifting frequency range between 3194.1 kHz and 3194.8 kHz until December of 1992. According to DXers' monitoring in Cajamarca, the station was actually tuned on a measured frequency of 1597 kHz, despite announcing a nominal frequency of 1600 kHz. Having discovered its fundamental frequency as 1597 kHz, we learned that 3194V kHz, on which Radio La Luz de la Vida was first noted by DX enthusiasts, could be the second harmonic.

In early October of 1992, Radio Líder del Norte started experimental transmissions on 5304.5 kHz. Shortly thereafter, the shortwave outlet moved down to another frequency range between 5338.9 and 5339.1 kHz. The shortwave operations were illegal. On the other hand, the station was licensed on February 13, 1992 to broadcast on the officially assigned medium wave frequency of 970 kHz with the callsign of OCY2K.

Afterward in April of 1993, another station identifying itself as Radio Jerusalen was observed on 3194.3 kHz. Seemingly, the station used the former transmitting equipment of Radio La Luz de la Vida. Radio Jerusalen claimed to broadcast from the religious community "Atahualpa-Jerusalen", a cooperative on the outskirts of Cajamarca, on 1600 kHz medium wave as well as the frequency on shortwave. It was not clear to us if the station utilized the transmitter of Radio La Luz de la Vida or if the frequency on shortwave was a second harmonic. The station announced both the medium wave and shortwave frequencies. As the station had never replied to reception reports from DX enthusiasts, it could not be confirmed whether if was a harmonic of the medium wave frequency or a separate shortwave transmitter. According to the DXers' monitoring, the station remained on the shortwave frequency until June of 1995.

According to the official frequency list of the Ministry of Transports and Communications, issued in November of 2000, eleven stations on medium wave, two stations on shortwave and seventeen stations on FM are licensed and registered in the Province of Cajamarca. Having made a band scan to check over the existence and nature of any broadcasting activity in Cajamarca and Los Baños del Inca between January 5 and January 7, 1995, I confirmed that nine stations on medium wave, one station on shortwave and eight stations on FM were in operation. The following lists are based on my monitoring in January of 1995 and the frequency list of the Ministry of Transports and Communications.

Medium wave

958.1 OCY2K Radio Líder del Norte, Cajamarca; 1 kW - (Its official assigned frequency is 970 kHz.) Transmitter site: Cerro Chamis, Predio La Collga, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Huánuco No. 2361, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1130.0 OAX2V Radio Los Andes, Cajamarca; 1.2 kW - [RPP repeater] Transmitter site: F. Huacariz km 4 Carrtera a Los Baños del Inca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Prolongación La Mar No. 530, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1200.2 OCX2T Radio Notícias, Cajamarca; 1 kW - (The nominal frequency was announced as 1190 kHz, however, the official assigned frequency was 1570 kHz as of 1995.) Transmitter site: Los Ayllus, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Etén No. 243, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1280.4 OBX2F Radio Moderna, Cajamarca; 1 kW Transmitter site: Barrio Aranfuez, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Apurímac No. 694, 2º piso, oficina No. 5, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1364.4 OAX2D Radio Cajamarca, Cajamarca; 1 kW - (Its official assigned frequency is 1370 kHz.) Transmitter site: Baños del Inca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón La Mar No. 675 3º y 4º piso, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1379.8 OAX2W Radio Atahualpa, Cajamarca; 1 kW Transmitter site: Urbanización Fátima Espalda Hospital Regional, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Juan XXIII y Esquina Plaza Bolognesi, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1420.0 ------ Radio Nor Agricultura, Los Baños del Inca; 1 kW Transmitter site: Avenida Manco Capac s/n, Los Baños del Inca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca, Studio: Jirón La Mar No. 675 3º y 4º piso, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1517.0 OCX2Q Radio La Voz del Inca, Los Baños del Inca; 1 kW (Its official assigned frequency is 1510 kHz.) Transmitter site: Prolongación Pachacutec s/n, Los Baños del Inca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Avenida Manco Capac No. 275, Los Baños del Inca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1559.9 OBX2J Radio Nuevo Continente, Cajamarca; 1 kW - (Its official assigned frequency is 820 kHz.) Transmitter site: Jirón Cinco Esquinas No. 563, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Cinco Esquinas No. 563, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.

Medium wave stations which have been off the air in recent years
1010.0 OBX2P Radio San Francisco, Cajamarca; 1.5 kW Transmitter site: Los Baños del Inca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca, Studio: Jirón 2 de Mayo No.271, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1170.0 OCY2U Radio Layzón, Cajamarca; 1 kW - (Between 1989 and 1990, the station remained on 1400 kHz.) Transmitter site: Zona Lucmacucho, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Sullana No.212, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.

Registered medium wave stations not yet on the air
860.0 OCY2A Radio CPN, Cajamarca; 1 kW [repeating station] - (It was licensed on December 29, 1989.) Transmitter site: Jirón Amazonas No. 725, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Avenida Paseo de la República No. 3662, San Isidro, Lima.
890.0 OCY2N Radiodifusión Libertad, Ventanilla de Otuzco; 1 kW - (It was licensed on April 16, 1996.) Transmitter site: Caserio Ventanilla de Otuzco, Los Baños del Inca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Caserio Ventanilla de Otuzco, Los Baños del Inca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1080.0 OCY2B Andes Radiodifusión, Cajamarca; 1 kW - (It was licensed on February 15, 1990.) Transmitter site: Zona Colga, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Avenida Arequipa No. 101, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1200.0 OAU2A Frecuencia Pedagógica, Cajamarca; 1 kW - (It was licensed on February 15, 1997.) Transmitter site: Zona denominada La Laguna, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Avenida El Maestro No. 290, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
1250.0 OCY2J Radiodifusión Estación Americana, Cajamarca; 1 kW Transmitter site: Zona Paccha, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Lima s/n, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.

Shortwave station

4238.1 OAX2G Radio Cajamarca, Cajamarca; 1 kW - (Its official assigned frequency was 4770 kHz.) Transmitter site: Baños del Inca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón La Mar No. 675 3º y 4º piso, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.

Shortwave station which has been off the air in recent years
4820.0 OAZ2F Radio Atahualpa, Cajamarca; 1 kW Transmitter site: Urbanización Fátima Espalda Hospital Regional, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Juan XXIII y Esquina Plaza Bolognesi, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.

Shortwave station which has already cancelled its license
5190.6 OAZ2E Radio Nuevo Continente, Cajamarca; 1 kW - (Its official assigned frequency was 3230 kHz.) Transmitter site: Jirón Cinco Esquinas No. 563, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Cinco Esquinas No. 563, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.

Registered shortwave station which has never been on the air
4945.0 OAZ2C Radio Moderna, Cajamarca; 1 kW Transmitter site: Barrio Aranfuez, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Apurímac No. 694, 2do piso, oficina No. 5, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.

FM

89.9 OCZ2H Radio Atahualpa, Cajamarca; 0.25 kW Transmitter site: Jirón Juan XXIII y Esquina Plaza Bolognesi, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Juan XXIII y Esquina Plaza Bolognesi, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
96.9 OBW2F Radiodifusora El Clarín, Cajamarca; 0.25 kW Transmitter site: Jirón Cruz de Piedra No. 460, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Cruz de Piedra No. 460, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
91.9 OCZ2K Radio San Francisco, Cajamarca; 0.5 kW Transmitter site: Jirón 2 de Mayo No. 271, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón 2 de Mayo No. 271, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
96.1 OCW2J Andes Radiodifusión, Cajamarca; 1 kW Transmitter site: Avenida Arequipa No. 101, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Avenida Arequipa No. 101, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
97.7 OCW2V Radiodifusora Latina, Cajamarca; 1 kW Transmitter site: Jirón del Comercio No. 549, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón del Comercio No. 549, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
101.3 OCZ2I Radio Los Andes FM, Cajamarca; 1 kW [RPP repeater] Transmitter site: Jirón La Mar No. 530, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón La Mar No. 530, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.
105.7 OCW2S Radiomar FM, Cajamarca; 1 kW Transmitter site: Pasaje Jaén No. 165, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.

FM station which has already cancelled its license
101.2 OCZ2E Radio Nuevo Continente, Cajamarca; 1 kW Transmitter site: Jirón Cinco Esquinas No. 563, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca. Studio: Jirón Cinco Esquinas No. 563, Cajamarca, Provincia de Cajamarca, Departamento de Cajamarca.

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This website is maintained by Don Moore,
Association of North American Radio Clubs
DXer of the Year for 1995
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